Welcome to RRPedia
Your Interactive Resource for EPA RRP Information

RRPedia logoLooking for accurate information about the EPA RRP rule?

RRPedia has been created by Shawn McCadden to help remodelers and others affected by the New EPA Renovation Repair and Painting Rule. 

Please read RRPedia Use and Contribution Information before using or contributing to RRPedia.

 


You Can Browse For RRP Topics By Using The Tags List To The Right

RRP Refresher: What is Vertical Containment and When is it Required?

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Sun, Apr 08, 2012 @ 12:07 PM

RRP Training Refresher: What is Vertical Containment and When is it Required?

RRPedia Refresher Key

 

It’s probably been a while since you took your RRP Certified Renovator Training Class.  This blog post is offered as a refresher topic to help you keep important details about the RRP rule top of mind when selling, estimating or performing RRP renovations.

 

What is Vertical Containment

ZipWall vertical containment

 

 

Vertical containment refers to a vertical barrier consisting of plastic sheeting or other impermeable material over scaffolding or a rigid frame, or an equivalent system of containing the work area. Vertical containment is required for some exterior renovations but it may be used on any interior or exterior renovation.

 

 

Is vertical containment required for interior jobs?

Interior vertical containment for RRPNo, the use of vertical containment is not required for interior jobs, but you can minimize the amount of floor containment needed by making use of vertical containment for interior projects.  Floor containment measures may stop at the edge of the vertical barrier when using a vertical containment system consisting of impermeable barriers that extend from the floor to the ceiling and are tightly sealed at joints with the floor, ceiling and walls.  One advantage of vertical containment in addition to the reduction of floor area to be covered is the potential reduction of the floor area and other areas that will need to be cleaned on completion of renovations

 

Is vertical containment required for exterior jobs?

exterior vertical containmentYes, vertical containment, or an equivalent system of containing the work area, is required for exterior jobs where the property line is within 10 feet of the area of paint disturbance. In addition, vertical containment can also be used to minimize the amount of ground containment needed for a project.  Ground containment measures may stop at the edge of the vertical barrier when using a vertical containment system.

 

 

Creative Use of Vertical Containment

Cutt down door for carpetConstructing vertical containment can also allow the contractor to create a sealed working space within a room where the dust can be completely contained to a limited and controlled area.  The space created is referred to as a “dust room”.  This can be extremely helpful in reducing containment and cleaning costs in other work areas if painted components are brought to this area to be repaired or modified, and are then cleaned before returning them to their original location.  One example of this might be cutting down interior doors after the installation of carpeting.  Another might be ripping down head stops when installing replacement windows.

 

Additional Resources

What is a "Dust Room" and why consider using one for EPA RRP work?

Zip Wall video about creating a variety of vertical barriers using their products

Topics: Containment Considerations, RRP for Dummies, Work Practices, Definitions

RRP Training Refresher: Defining Work Area Containment

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Thu, Mar 22, 2012 @ 05:00 AM

RRP Training Refresher: Defining Work Area Containment

RRPedia Refresher Key

 

It’s probably been a while since you took your RRP Certified Renovator Training Class.  This blog post is offered as a refresher topic to help you keep important details about the RRP rule top of mind when selling, estimating or performing RRP renovations.

 

Refresher: Defining Work Area Containment

What is Containment?

RRP Containment

 

 

“Containment” is what is required under the RRP Rule to prevent dust and debris from spreading beyond the work area to non-work areas.  In general, there are many degrees of containment, ranging from simple plastic sheeting on the floor surrounding a small work area to a fully enclosed space. Some types of containment are more effective than other types.

 

Why is Containment Required?

RRP RespiratorContainment is required by the RRP Rule because it reduces the risk to you and residents. Following the work area setup requirements will protect you, your co-workers and residents by confining lead-contained dust and debris to a defined and demarcated area. Confining the lead is an important consideration in avoiding exposure. Reducing the risk to you and co-workers is also dependent upon use of personal protective equipment.  Requirements for the personal protection of workers are established by OSHA and can be found in the OSHA document titled “Lead in Construction”

 

RRP HEPA VacProper containment also facilitates efficient cleaning of the work area. The pre-work setup process is essential to keeping lead-contaminated dust confined to the work area where it can be easily cleaned. Proper containment of the work area helps to limit the area you need to clean after the job is complete. Knowing exactly where to clean is an important factor in saving time (and money) spent on cleanup. 

Controlling dust and debris may require more extensive containment than is specified in the rule if the job is particularly dusty. For example, small areas of ceiling work can spread dust over the entire room and are very difficult to control. 

 

Containing the Work Area Includes:

  • Removing objects and furniture from the work area, or covering them with plastic sheeting.
  • RRP Vertical containmentCovering floors (or the ground) with plastic sheeting a minimum distance beyond the surfaces being renovated (6 feet for interior jobs and 10 feet for exterior jobs).
      • Vertical containment is required for any exterior renovation within 10 feet of the property line. 
      • Larger areas of disposable plastic sheeting may also be necessary to prevent the spread of dust. 
      • Smaller areas of containment may be used if additional precautions such as vertical containment are used to stop the spread of dust and minimize the area of cleanup. 
  • Closing windows and doors, and using plastic sheeting to seal doors and air ducts in the work area. 
  • Covering doors used to enter the work area with plastic sheeting in a manner that allows workers to pass through but contains dust and debris within the work area.

 

Topics: Personal Protection, Containment Considerations, RRP for Dummies, Refresher Information

Guest Blog: New Understandings About The Required RRP Work Practices

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Tue, Mar 20, 2012 @ 05:00 AM

Making RRP Easier - New Understandings About RRP Work Practices

 

Dean Lovvorn, lead inspector

 

 

Guest Blogger:  Dean Lovvorn is a residential remodeler who has done numerous RRP projects.  He is also a Lead Inspector, Lead Risk Assessor and EPA RRP Renovator Instructor. 

This blog post is a follow-up to a previous RRPedia Guest Blog where Dean listed several differences between the work practices taught in the required Certified Renovator class and what he found is actually required in the RRP rule.

 

Making RRP Easier - New Understandings About RRP Work Practices

RRP ideas

 

 

Back in April 2010, I had an exterior remodeling job that was put on hold for a day because of heavy rains.  In my boredom, I decided to read the actual RRP law from start to finish.  I soon discovered that what I was taught in my 8 hour class and what was in the student manual wasn’t necessarily in the actual law itself.     

 

I was probably dozing off in the 8 hour renovator class, but after these discoveries, I began to clarify some new understandings.

  • On exterior containment set-ups, all I really needed to do was put plastic on the ground, be sure windows & doors were closed, cover any doors within 20 feet with plastic and put out a warning sign.  If there are no doors and/or windows within 20 feet, simply put plastic on the ground and a warning sign up.  Nothing else needed.
  • On interior containment set-ups, I just needed to do the same as the exterior (except 6 feet out from where I was working).  If there were no furniture/objects or ducts within the 6 foot area … I didn’t have to go any further.  Be sure to tape down the plastic on the floor.

Of course, if I was doing some really dusty work, I made the containment (work area) larger, but other than that, it was pretty quick, easy and simple if you were to ask me.

 

Following are some examples of how reading the actual law has helped me.

Siding Replacement

RRP Vertical containmentIn this example, I would place 3.5 mil plastic (from Home Depot), instead of the 6 mil plastic 10 feet out on the ground.  Then, I would make sure doors/windows were closed, put plastic over any doors and then put up the warning sign.  I would also run a plastic runner out to the dumpster and surround the ground around the dumpster with plastic.  Doing the containment this way, saves me from having to wrap, bag or HEPA vac the siding (or myself).  This is because I can dump the siding without ever going outside the containment area.

If exterior vertical containment is needed a simple solution (pictured to right) can be done.

Replacing Door Slabs

If my job is to replace 15 door slabs, I simply do this without following RRP.  This is because the only area I am disturbing on each door is the hinge area and since it falls under the Minor Repair and Maintenance Activities, RRP is not required.  This insight came from the FAQ section of the EPA web site.

Bathroom Remodel (Total Gut)

RRP Work Area Containment for a BathroomI can demo the tile, tub, shower, toilet and remove the demolition debris without doing any RRP.  After that has been done, I cover up ducts with plastic,  make sure windows are closed, close doors and cover with plastic, put up a warning sign and then cover the subfloor with plastic (6 feet out from where I will be working). 

I put the demoed walls, cabinets and trim into trash cans (with lids on top) and HEPA vac the outside of the trash cans (along with myself) before taking them out of the containment area.

Note:  If I’m lucky and there is an exit door (to the outside) close by … I could run plastic to the door, then outside to the dumpster.  This way, I wouldn’t need to worry about containing the demolition debris.

Normally, I do the final clean-up, visual inspection and cleaning verification after demolition; so that I can officially end RRP and let non-certified electricians/plumbers/sub-contractors into the work area.

 

Conclusion

Selling RRPIt very well could be that if you did a little homework by reading the actual law, you could reduce the cost of compliance on many jobs to less than 5%.  Few contractors will lose a job because they are higher by less than 5%.  Plus, with the cost less than 5%, I don’t even mention RRP to my clients during the estimation process anymore, which has helped to improve sales. 

 

Topics: Production Considerations, EPA RRP for Dummies, Containment Considerations, Subcontractor Considerations, Sales Considerations, Compliance Options, Work Practices, Opinions from Renovators, Guest Blogs

Guest Blog: The RRP Training Suggests More Than The Rule Requires

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Fri, Mar 16, 2012 @ 05:00 AM

Guest Blog: Making RRP Easier – The RRP Training Suggests Doing Way More Than The Rule Requires

Dean Lovvorn

 

 

 

Guest Blogger: Dean Lovvorn is a residential remodeler who has done numerous RRP projects.  He is also a Lead Inspector, Lead Risk Assessor and EPA RRP Renovator Instructor.

 

Making RRP Easier – The RRP Training Suggests Doing Way More Than The Rule Requires

RRP work Practices

 

Back in April 2010, I had an exterior remodeling job that was put on hold for a day because of heavy rains.  In my boredom, I decided to read the actual RRP law from start to finish.  Honestly, it was like watching paint dry (incredibly boring). 

However, as I continued reading, I soon discovered that what I was taught in my 8 hour class and what was in the student manual wasn’t necessarily in the actual law itself.

 

 

My Discoveries - In the actual law I found:


  1. RRP RespiratorThere was no mention of having to wear disposable suits, dust mask, booties or headwear. (Still might need to comply with OSHA)
  2. That I didn’t have to put construction debris in a heavy duty plastic bag.  I had to at final clean-up, but not when taking out demolition debris.
  3. There was no requirement to put plastic over windows.
  4. That there was no mention of putting yellow warning tape at 20 feet out on exterior jobs.
  5. That on many jobs, the only paperwork required was a signed receipt of the Renovate Right booklet and completing the record keeping checklist.  This takes me about 5 minutes to do.
  6. Homeowners ignoring RRP RuleIt didn’t say I had to use 6 mil plastic, which made me happy since the 3.5 mil plastic sold at Home Depot cost less.
  7. I didn’t have to mention (if I didn’t want to) anything about RRP during my sales presentations or while giving estimates.  This was especially helpful, because clients don’t want to hear about being lead poisoned … they want to hear about their beautiful renovation.

Watch for Dean's next guest blog where he describes the work practices he now uses to make RRP easier at the job site


Topics: Production Considerations, EPA RRP for Dummies, Certified Renovator Training, Containment Considerations, Compliance Options, Work Practices, Opinions from Renovators, Guest Blogs

RRP and Picking Up The Pieces After DIY Renovations

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Fri, Nov 05, 2010 @ 08:54 AM

RRP Work Can Be Risky if You Are Picking Up The Pieces After a Home Owner Does Their Own Work

Lead Pain Chips and Lead Dust on Picnic Table

 

In a recent RRPedia article titled “Most Children Poisoned by Lead during Renovations Poisoned by Their Parents”, One commenter posted the following the following comment and question:

“Shawn, this is actually something that I've been thinking about for some months now. As a handyman, I'm called upon to come in after a 'DIYer' has attempted and failed to complete a project. How are contractors supposed to protect themselves with the knowledge that anyone (especially kids) in the house could already have lead poisoning? It's kind of extreme, but do we need to have everyone in the home get tested before we sign a contract to begin repairing their repair work? It's troubling to say the least. There's no doubt that if homeowners were held to the same rules regarding the RRP, there would be more contractor work as they (the homeowners) would not want to go through all the protective measures. Thoughts?”

Scott Remsen

 

Lead Paint Chips and lead paint dust on groundThis is an excellent observation and question. The liability in such a situation is huge. I just recently had a conversation about this topic with an attorney well familiar with the RRP rule. Her suggestion was to consider asking the home owner to do testing of the occupants and perhaps even dust wipe testing at the home before beginning any work to establish a point of reference. Discussing this with and asking the home owner to do so would obviously be a sensitive conversation and could likely be a tough sell for many contractors.

 

Attourney Andrea GoldmanIn the video below Attorney Andrea Goldman discusses options renovators can consider if they are asked to do RRP work following behind a DIY Home Owner.  This video was filmed at a site where very large lead paint chips were left all around a recently repainted deck.  The video shows paint scraping debris all over the ground and on a picnic table.  The house was right near the ocean.  As you can probably tell from the audio the wind was blowing, causing the paint chips and dust to be spread all around the yard and walkways.  Obviously there was total disregard for any containment or clean up at all, as evidenced by the size of the paint chips.

 

 

If you are looking for forms and signage to help you with comply with the EPA RRP rule, I recommend you check out what The Lead Paint Forms Store has to offer.

Topics: RRP Questions, EPA RRP for Dummies, Containment Considerations, Legal Considerations, Documentation Considerations, Health Effects of Lead, Videos

RRP Rule Interior Containment General Requirements

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Wed, Sep 29, 2010 @ 08:43 AM

RRP Rule Interior Containment General Requirements:

Lead Test KitThe RRP rule requires that dust and debris be controlled in the work area while working in homes built prior to 1978 unless all effected components of the renovation are properly tested and lead is not found.  You can find information about the legal definition of lead paint and the accuracy of testing methods here.

 

In general, renovations that involve only a small amount of paint disturbance create less dust than jobs that involve larger areas of paint disturbance. However, in addition to the size of the area of paint disturbed, the work practices (e.g., sanding) and equipment used will also affect how much dust is created and how the dust migrates. The location of the work activity also has a bearing on the amount of dust that is distributed. For example, small areas of ceiling work can spread dust over the entire room and are very difficult to control.

Zip Wall containmentRequired containment is similar for all jobs, but jobs that generate more dust and debris may require protection of larger areas. While the Rule does not require vertical containment, such systems may be helpful in limiting the size of the area affected by the work and may reduce the area that must be cleaned at the end of the job. Pre-engineered containment systems (purchased and home-made) are very helpful in cutting time spent on the job erecting containment and are easier to install than hanging plastic sheeting with tape. These systems also allow the contractor to create a sealed room within a room where the dust can be completely contained to a limited and controlled area.   Click here to download a helpful list of tools and supplies for RRP work.

Remember, you are responsible for making sure that dust and debris remain inside of the contained work area. When planning containment, keep in mind how, how much, and where the work practices to be used will create dust, and plan accordingly.  This information should also be considered when estimating the cost to do the work.

General requirements for interior containment:

Warning signPosted signs: These must be posted on all sides of the work area to define the work area, must be in the primary language of occupants, must be posted before the beginning of the renovation, and must remain until cleaning verification is achieved.
Contain the work area: Before renovation, isolate the work area to prevent the escape of dust. During work, maintain the containment integrity and ensure that containment does not interfere with occupant and worker egress from the home or work area.
Remove or cover furniture/objects: Remove (preferred) objects like furniture, rugs, window coverings; or cover them with plastic sheeting with all seams and edges taped.
Cover floors: Cover floors including carpets in the work area with taped down plastic sheeting or other impermeable material to 6 feet beyond the perimeter of surfaces undergoing renovation or to a distance sufficient to contain dust, whichever is greater.
Close and seal doorways and close windows: Close and seal doorways and close windows in the work area with plastic sheeting or other impermeable material. Doors used as entrances to the work area must be covered with plastic sheeting that allows workers to pass through while confining dust to the work area.
Cover duct openings: Close and cover all HVAC vents in the work area with taped down plastic sheeting or other impermeable materials (e.g., magnetic covers).
Remove dust and debris from everything leaving the work area: Use precautions to ensure that all personnel, tools and all other items are free from dust and debris before being removed from the work area.

If you are looking for forms and signage to help you with comply with the EPA RRP rule, I recommend you check out what The Lead Paint Forms Store has to offer.

Topics: Estimating Considerations, Production Considerations, Containment Considerations, RRP for Dummies, Work Practices, Tools and Supplies

Doing EPA RRP Work? OSHA Will Be Watching For You.

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Tue, Aug 31, 2010 @ 09:00 AM

Compliance With and Enforcement of the RRP Rule Will Be Assisted By OSHA Inspectors

OSHA LogoIn addition to the OSHA rules contractors should already have been aware of related to worker safety, the EPA RRP rule has added yet additional OSHA concerns for renovators.  One for example is working on a surface covered with plastic. OSHA considerations related to working on plastic are not part of the curriculum delivered during the required EPA certified renovator training. Due to the absence of this information, the EPA is essentially leaving it up to renovators to become aware of such considerations on their own.  Once aware, renovators must seek out the information they need and adjust their work practices accordingly to avoid fines from OSHA should they get randomly inspected.   Or worse, have a worker accident. 

keep right wrThis begs a few questions.  First, were the authors ignorant of such considerations?  Asked another way, does the left hand know what the right hand is doing?  Is this another example of a breakdown in communication between very significant departments of our government charged to look out for our best interests?  A second question might be; did the authors of the EPA RRP rule leave this information out of the rule for a strategic purpose?  Perhaps this is just one more way to force small independent businesses out of the construction industry in favor or labor unions. 

In one of his recent blogs, RRP certification training provider and business coach, Mark Paskell of The Contractor Coaching Partnership, shares a real life story about a contractor who was visited, at the same time, by both an OSHA inspector as well as an inspector from the Massachusetts Department of Occupational Safety (DOS).  (Massachusetts has assumed administration and enforcement of the RRP rule from EOPA)  In the blog Mark describes the battle that took place between the OSHA inspector and the DOS inspector about the use of plastic on the jobsite. Check out the blog to see which inspector retreated. 

Warning SignOf bigger concern should be the distribution of misinformation at the certified renovator training.  For example, using the sample signage included in the EPA approved training manual (required to be posted outside contained work areas), might just get you in trouble with OSHA.  First off the RRP rule requires the use of a “warning” sign, but the sample sign is a “caution” sign.  OSHA considers a warning sign to be a stronger message than a caution sign, and has rules dictating when and how to choose one versus the other. 

Also, if you have employees, the sample sign in the manual will not meet OSHA requirements either.  Employees must be told what they are being warned about on such signs, in this case lead, and the signs must also instruct the employees not to smoke, eat, or drink in a work area assumed to contain lead.  Check out this article by Dick Hughes of Excellence in Safety for a list of other OSHA requirements left out of the RRP rule. 

The RRP is challenging enough to comply with.  Contractors putting their heads in the sand about OSHA requirements and compliance are taking a huge risk.  I am planning on taking some OSHA training classes to learn more about what contractors must need to be aware of and what they will need to do to avoid risking violations and fines.  I will post information about this subject to RRPedia in the future.   If you have not done so already, you can subscribe to RRPedia at the top of this page.   Subscribers will be notified by e-mail as soon as new articles are posted.

If you are looking for forms and signage to help you with comply with the EPA RRP rule, I recommend you check out what The Lead Paint Forms Store has to offer.

Topics: EPA RRP Lead Rules, RRP in MA, Certified Renovator Training, OSHA Considerations, Containment Considerations, Enforcement and Inspections, Shawn's Predictions, Effects of the RRP Rule

For Large RRP Remodels; Renovate or Tear Down and Start Over?

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Wed, Aug 18, 2010 @ 07:19 AM

For Large RRP Remodels; Renovate or Tear Down and Start Over?

Question from an RRPedia User:

Renovate, tear down or start over?
“Shawn, We have met a number of times, most recently at the Rings End event, which was great, informative and overwhelming. I'm not sure where to go for the answer to this question and thought maybe you could direct me. We are bidding a sizable remodel and the architect has note for that bidders are to follow RRP guidelines. Its pre-1978, we will be disturbing 75%+ of the existing structure and it is unoccupied. I'm thinking that we don't need to address the tarping and cleanup because of the magnitude and vacancy. If we do then we need to consider a tear down. Any guidance you can give would be appreciated. I'm sure you get this all the time so I understand if you can't get to it. Best regards, 
Ray Gaines Sr, Gaines Construction Co. Inc.

 

Ray:
Thanks for your message. This question has come up several times already from other contractors like you who are trying to do the right thing and interpret the EPA RRP rule correctly.

The fact that the property is unoccupied during the renovation makes no difference regarding whether the EPA RRP rule applies. This is confirmed on the FAQ page of the EPA web site. Because of the removal of the opt-out provision in July of this year, any residential property where people live or will live (referred to as target housing) now requires the lead-safe practices unless the home tests out negative for lead under the EPA guidelines.

Also under the EPA RRP Rule, unless the entire interior of the structure is gutted down to bare wood, with no coated or painted surfaces remaining, the project must be treated as an RRP project and again the work must be done using lead-safe work practices.  A full removal of all exterior finishes however does require the RRP Lead-safe work practices.  Again, this is confirmed on the FAQ page of the EPA web site.  Keep in mind, all documentation requirements apply as well.

As a side note, your message does say the building is pre 1978; however you do not say whether the property was tested for lead.  If it hasn't been tested, one option to the owner would be to test it.  Of course, if there is no lead, the rule would not apply.

Lead test kitsThe EPA approved test kits sold by LeadCheck are very accurate.  These tests reliably determine the presence or absence of lead.  If you use these tests the owner would know if any lead is present at all.  However, under the RRP Rule, the EPA says the rule exempts renovations that affect only components that a certified lead inspector or certified risk assessor has determined are free of paint or other surface coatings that contain lead equal to or in excess of 1.0 milligrams per square centimeter (mg/cm2) or 0.5% by weight. EPA further explains that the determination that any particular component is free of lead-based paint may be made as part of a lead-based paint inspection of an entire housing unit or building, or on a component-by-component basis.

So, if the property owner wants to know if there is any lead at all, the EPA approved LeadCheck test kits could be used to do so.  If the owner chooses to use the EPA's action level of lead paint amount to determine if the lead-safe practices would be required, then currently the only way to test for amount of lead would be to use a certified lead inspector or certified lead risk assessor.  

Nice fishOne way to think about this might be to relate it to eating fish.  The government often says that if you fish in certain bodies of polluted water, you can safely eat up to so many of the fish you catch without any health concerns.  If the government says you can eat up to 3 fish a year, how safe would you feel eating even one fish?  Using this analogy, how safe might the owner feel having renovations done if there is any lead present at all at their property?

If you have opportunity to interact with the property owner, I suggest you might find you would stand out from the other bidders if you could share what I have written here with the owners.  It is my opinion that the property owners should know the facts, know their options and then make a decision about how to move forward regarding lead at their homes.

Topics: EPA RRP Lead Rules, RRP Questions, Estimating Considerations, Containment Considerations, Sales Considerations, Compliance Options, RRP for Dummies, Work Practices, Health Effects of Lead, Lead Test Kits and Testing

Working on Buildings Where a Child Occupied Facility Exists

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Thu, Jun 24, 2010 @ 08:00 AM

Chruch interior

 

Several renovators seeking clarification about the EPA RRP Rule have asked me about working on buildings where a child occupied facility occupies part of the building, but not the entire building.  The most common example they ask about is a church.  The following question and answer are from the FAQ page of the EPA Web site.  Although not mentioned in EPA's answer, I suggest that play areas outside of the building would also be considered common areas where the required containment procedures and work practices would be required.

Question Posted to EPA Web Site: If a building contains a child-occupied facility, must all renovations in the building follow the RRP Rule?

EPA Answer: Not necessarily.  "Child-occupied facility'' means a building, or portion of a building, constructed prior to 1978, visited regularly by the same child, under 6 years of age, on at least two different days within any week (Sunday through Saturday period), provided that each day's visit lasts at least 3 hours and the combined weekly visits last at least 6 hours, and the combined annual visits last at least 60 hours.  Child-occupied facilities may include, but are not limited to, day care centers, preschools and kindergarten classrooms.  Child-occupied facilities may be located in target housing or in public or commercial buildings.

cafeteria

With respect to common areas in public or commercial buildings that contain child-occupied facilities, the child-occupied facility encompasses only those common areas that are routinely used by children under age 6, such as restrooms and cafeterias.  Common areas that children under age 6 only pass through, such as hallways, stairways, and garages are not included.  In addition, with respect to exteriors of public or commercial buildings that contain child-occupied facilities, the child-occupied facility encompasses only the exterior sides of the building that are immediately adjacent to the child-occupied facility or the common areas routinely used by children under age 6.

Areas of a building that fall outside this definition are not "child-occupied facilities" for purposes of the RRP rule.  

Topics: RRP Questions, Work Practice Exclusions, Containment Considerations, Work Practices

EPA RRP Considerations for Demolition of All or Part of a Structure

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Fri, Jun 18, 2010 @ 09:40 AM

House demolition

 

Question from RRPedia visitor Dan Tibma of Tibma Design/Build"Under the EPA RRP rule, if I demo an attached garage completely, except for the foundation, what site and debris containment measures do I need to take?"

Dan, thanks for visiting my web site and for your question.  I hope you are well.  I had already started a post about this topic, so you motivated me to finish it and get it posted.  Thanks!

I had asked the EPA a similar question in the list of questions presented to the EPA Region One Office on January 6th, 2010 on behalf of the Eastern MA NARI Chapter.  Eventually, on April 7, 2010, EPA answered the question in the FAQ section of their web site.

Here is the question I asked:

Does the Renovation, Repair, and Painting (RRP) Rule apply to demolishing and disposing of:

  • An entire pre-1978 home or building?
  • An entire, non-attached free-standing structure on the same property such as a garage, shed, or gazebo?
  • An attached but segregated section of pre-1978 home or building such as a sunroom, addition, two-story porch, or garage attached by a breezeway?

Here is the EPA's response:

Garage demolition"The RRP Rule covers renovations, which are defined as modifications of existing structures or portions of structures. The rule does not apply to demolitions of an entire free-standing building or structure.

The RRP Rule does apply to renovation activities that modify portions of existing structures. Waste from these activities must be contained to prevent releases of dust and debris before the waste is removed from the work area for storage or disposal. If a chute is used to remove waste from the work area, it must be covered.

At the conclusion of each work day and at the conclusion of the renovation, waste that has been collected from renovation activities must be stored under containment, in an enclosure, or behind a barrier that prevents release of dust and debris out of the work are an d prevents access to dust and debris.

When the firm transports waste from renovation activities, the firm must contain the waste to prevent release of dust and debris."


 

Topics: RRP Questions, Estimating Considerations, Production Considerations, Work Practice Exclusions, Containment Considerations