Welcome to RRPedia
Your Interactive Resource for EPA RRP Information

RRPedia logoLooking for accurate information about the EPA RRP rule?

RRPedia has been created by Shawn McCadden to help remodelers and others affected by the New EPA Renovation Repair and Painting Rule. 

Please read RRPedia Use and Contribution Information before using or contributing to RRPedia.

 


You Can Browse For RRP Topics By Using The Tags List To The Right

Refresher: RRP Rule Interior Containment General Requirements

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Wed, May 16, 2012 @ 06:00 AM

RRP Training Refresher: RRP Rule Interior Containment General Requirements

RRPedia Refresher Key

 

It’s probably been a while since you took your RRP Certified Renovator Training Class.  This blog post is offered as a refresher topic to help you keep important details about the RRP rule top of mind when selling, estimating or performing RRP renovations.

 

RRP Rule Interior Containment General Requirements:

  • RRP SignsPosted signs: These must be posted on all sides of the work area to define the work area, must be in the primary language of occupants, must be posted before the beginning of the renovation, and must remain until cleaning verification is achieved.
  • Contain the work area: Before renovation, isolate the work area to prevent the escape of dust. During work, maintain the containment integrity and ensure that containment does not interfere with occupant and worker egress from the home or work area.
  • RRP Containment for furnatureRemove or cover furniture/objects: Remove (preferred) objects like furniture, rugs, window coverings; or cover them with plastic sheeting with all seams and edges taped.
  • Cover floors: Cover floors including carpets in the work area with taped down plastic sheeting or other impermeable material to 6 feet beyond the perimeter of surfaces undergoing renovation or to a distance sufficient to contain dust, whichever is greater.  Remember, if vertical containment is used floor containment measures may stop at the edge of the vertical containment.
  • Close windows, close and seal doors: Close windows, close and seal doors in the work area with plastic sheeting or other impermeable material. Doors used as entrances to the work area must be covered with plastic sheeting that allows workers to pass through while confining dust to the work area.
  • RRP Containment for duct openingCover duct opening: Close and cover all HVAC vents in the work area with taped down plastic sheeting or other impermeable materials (e.g., magnetic covers).
  • Remove dust and debris from everything leaving the work area: Use precautions to ensure that all personnel, tools and all other items are free from dust and debris before being removed from the work area.

 

Topics: Production Considerations, EPA RRP for Dummies, RRP for Dummies, Work Practices, Signage, Refresher Information

RRP Training Refresher: Defining Work Area Containment

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Thu, Mar 22, 2012 @ 05:00 AM

RRP Training Refresher: Defining Work Area Containment

RRPedia Refresher Key

 

It’s probably been a while since you took your RRP Certified Renovator Training Class.  This blog post is offered as a refresher topic to help you keep important details about the RRP rule top of mind when selling, estimating or performing RRP renovations.

 

Refresher: Defining Work Area Containment

What is Containment?

RRP Containment

 

 

“Containment” is what is required under the RRP Rule to prevent dust and debris from spreading beyond the work area to non-work areas.  In general, there are many degrees of containment, ranging from simple plastic sheeting on the floor surrounding a small work area to a fully enclosed space. Some types of containment are more effective than other types.

 

Why is Containment Required?

RRP RespiratorContainment is required by the RRP Rule because it reduces the risk to you and residents. Following the work area setup requirements will protect you, your co-workers and residents by confining lead-contained dust and debris to a defined and demarcated area. Confining the lead is an important consideration in avoiding exposure. Reducing the risk to you and co-workers is also dependent upon use of personal protective equipment.  Requirements for the personal protection of workers are established by OSHA and can be found in the OSHA document titled “Lead in Construction”

 

RRP HEPA VacProper containment also facilitates efficient cleaning of the work area. The pre-work setup process is essential to keeping lead-contaminated dust confined to the work area where it can be easily cleaned. Proper containment of the work area helps to limit the area you need to clean after the job is complete. Knowing exactly where to clean is an important factor in saving time (and money) spent on cleanup. 

Controlling dust and debris may require more extensive containment than is specified in the rule if the job is particularly dusty. For example, small areas of ceiling work can spread dust over the entire room and are very difficult to control. 

 

Containing the Work Area Includes:

  • Removing objects and furniture from the work area, or covering them with plastic sheeting.
  • RRP Vertical containmentCovering floors (or the ground) with plastic sheeting a minimum distance beyond the surfaces being renovated (6 feet for interior jobs and 10 feet for exterior jobs).
      • Vertical containment is required for any exterior renovation within 10 feet of the property line. 
      • Larger areas of disposable plastic sheeting may also be necessary to prevent the spread of dust. 
      • Smaller areas of containment may be used if additional precautions such as vertical containment are used to stop the spread of dust and minimize the area of cleanup. 
  • Closing windows and doors, and using plastic sheeting to seal doors and air ducts in the work area. 
  • Covering doors used to enter the work area with plastic sheeting in a manner that allows workers to pass through but contains dust and debris within the work area.

 

Topics: Personal Protection, Containment Considerations, RRP for Dummies, Refresher Information

RRP Training Refresher: Health Risks of Lead

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Thu, Feb 16, 2012 @ 06:00 AM

RRP Training Refresher: Health Risks of Lead

RRPedia Refresher Key

 

It’s probably been a while since you took your RRP Certified Renovator Training Class.  This blog post is offered as a refresher topic to help you keep important details about the RRP rule top of mind when selling, estimating or performing RRP renovations.

 

Lead poisoning does not always have obvious symptoms

The symptoms of lead poisoning are often non-specific, and are frequently attributed to other causes.  Specific symptoms that people with lead exposure sometimes complain of include:
  • Headache
  • Stomach ache
  • Irritability
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite
  • Joint and/or muscle pain
Because many symptoms are non-specific or similar to flu symptoms, parents may not be alerted to get immediate medical attention for their children. This is critical for young children. The longer a young child stays untreated, the higher the risk of permanent brain damage.

Blood test for Lead PaintWorkers with an occupational exposure to lead need to inform their doctors in order to give them all the background needed for an adequate evaluation of symptoms as possibly related to lead exposure.

The best way to determine if lead is present in the body is by testing blood.


Children under six are most at risk from small amounts of lead.

Children are at a greater risk than adults because their bodies are developing. During normal and frequent playing or hand-to-mouth activity, children may swallow or inhale dust from their hands, toys, food or other objects.

In children, lead can cause:

  • Lead Poisoning can cause ADDNervous system and kidney damage.
  • Decreased intelligence, attention deficit disorder, and learning disabilities.
  • Speech, language, and behavior problems.
 

Among adults, pregnant women are especially at risk from exposure to lead.

Lead is passed from the mother to the fetus and can cause:

  • Lead Poisoning can affect pregnant womenMiscarriages
  • Premature births
  • Brain damage
  • Low birth weight

 

Are you noticing any of the following about yourself or your co-workers?

Health effects of lead in adults include:

  • Lead Poisoning can cause mental issuesHigh blood pressure
  • Fertility problems in men and women
  • Health affects of lead paintDigestive problems
  • Nerve disorders
  • Memory and concentration problems
  • Sexual disorders
  • Muscle or joint pain.

Topics: Health Effects of Lead, Refresher Information

Refresher: Exemptions to RRP Work Practices

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Thu, Feb 09, 2012 @ 06:00 AM

Refresher: Exemptions to RRP Work Practices

RRP Training Manual

 

 

It’s probably been a while since you took your RRP Certified Renovator Training Class.  This is the first of several blog posts that will be added to RRPedia in the next few months or so to help renovators keep important details about the RRP rule top of mind when selling, estimating or performing RRP renovations.

The RRP Rule's required work practices may be waived under the following conditions:

  • The home or child occupied facility was built after 1978.
  • The property is used as housing for the elderly or persons with disabilities, unless any child who is less than 6 years of age resides or is expected to reside in such housing
  • The property is a zero-bedroom dwelling, such as studio apartments or dormitories.
  • The renovations are performed by the home owner(s) themselves
  • The renovations are performed without compensation (Examples might include friends, brother-in-law, or volunteers)
  • The repairs are minor, with interior work disturbing less than six square feet of painted surfaces per room or exteriors disturbing less than 20 square feet of painted surfaces on the entire envelope.
  • The work practices do not apply if the entire house or specifically affected components,Lead testing requirements for RRP Rule as described within a scope of work for the project, test lead free by a Certified Risk Assessor, Lead Inspector or Certified Renovator
  • In the case that renovations are for emergency or interim control purposes, the work practices do not apply.  However, in these situations, the cleaning practices and cleaning verification are still required.
 

I did a RRP videos series for Remodeling magazine shortly after the RRP Rule went into effect.  In video #6 titled; Exemptions to RRP Work Practices, I offer examples of when, where and why the RRP rule and work practices are not required under the rule. The video stresses that even if the work practices are not required under the RRP rule, your business will still be liable if lead poisoning and or contamination results from the way work is performed.  

Also, in the video contractor insurance expert Tom Messier of Mason and Mason Insurance stresses the importance of verifying proper and adequate insurance coverage to protect your business, available coverage options as well as related costs for coverage.

 

 

Topics: Work Practices, Insurance Considerations, RRP Questions, Exemptions to the Rule, Refresher Information