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Your Interactive Resource for EPA RRP Information

RRPedia logoLooking for accurate information about the EPA RRP rule?

RRPedia has been created by Shawn McCadden to help remodelers and others affected by the New EPA Renovation Repair and Painting Rule. 

Please read RRPedia Use and Contribution Information before using or contributing to RRPedia.

 


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Refresher: RRP Rule Interior Containment General Requirements

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Wed, May 16, 2012 @ 06:00 AM

RRP Training Refresher: RRP Rule Interior Containment General Requirements

RRPedia Refresher Key

 

It’s probably been a while since you took your RRP Certified Renovator Training Class.  This blog post is offered as a refresher topic to help you keep important details about the RRP rule top of mind when selling, estimating or performing RRP renovations.

 

RRP Rule Interior Containment General Requirements:

  • RRP SignsPosted signs: These must be posted on all sides of the work area to define the work area, must be in the primary language of occupants, must be posted before the beginning of the renovation, and must remain until cleaning verification is achieved.
  • Contain the work area: Before renovation, isolate the work area to prevent the escape of dust. During work, maintain the containment integrity and ensure that containment does not interfere with occupant and worker egress from the home or work area.
  • RRP Containment for furnatureRemove or cover furniture/objects: Remove (preferred) objects like furniture, rugs, window coverings; or cover them with plastic sheeting with all seams and edges taped.
  • Cover floors: Cover floors including carpets in the work area with taped down plastic sheeting or other impermeable material to 6 feet beyond the perimeter of surfaces undergoing renovation or to a distance sufficient to contain dust, whichever is greater.  Remember, if vertical containment is used floor containment measures may stop at the edge of the vertical containment.
  • Close windows, close and seal doors: Close windows, close and seal doors in the work area with plastic sheeting or other impermeable material. Doors used as entrances to the work area must be covered with plastic sheeting that allows workers to pass through while confining dust to the work area.
  • RRP Containment for duct openingCover duct opening: Close and cover all HVAC vents in the work area with taped down plastic sheeting or other impermeable materials (e.g., magnetic covers).
  • Remove dust and debris from everything leaving the work area: Use precautions to ensure that all personnel, tools and all other items are free from dust and debris before being removed from the work area.

 

Topics: Production Considerations, EPA RRP for Dummies, RRP for Dummies, Work Practices, Signage, Refresher Information

Labels, Signs and Printers for RRP – and Beyond: Guest Blog

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Thu, Jul 14, 2011 @ 06:00 AM

Labels, Signs and Printers for RRP – and Beyond

 

Steve Stephenson, Duralabel

 

 

 

 

Guest Blogger: Steve Stephenson is the Managing Director for Graphic Products at DuraLabel

 

You’ve been reading about the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rule which requires contractors performing renovation, repair and painting (RRP) projects that disturb lead-based paint in dwellings where children under six and/or pregnant women live to be certified and follow particular work practices including using signs and labels to prevent lead contamination.

EPA 40 CFR 745.85 states that firms must post signs clearly defining the work area and warning occupants and other persons not involved in renovation activities to remain outside of the work area. These signs must be in the primary language of the occupants. The signs must be posted before beginning the renovation and must remain in place and readable until the renovation and the post-renovation cleaning verification is completed.

The EPA says that signs and labels must adhere to this hierarchy:

  • The word “Warning” must be placed at the top of the sign
  • Underneath “Warning,” the sign must say “Lead Work Area”
  • Under that, “Poison”
  • Finally, under “Poison,” the sign must say “No drinking, eating or smoking”

These types of warning signs and labels typically may be purchased pre-printed in bulk. Other types of signs are also often required. These are custom signs and labels for commercial jobs, final inspections and re-labeling painted pipes and drains. There are a number of approaches to making these signs and labels, too.  

Consider:

  • How frequently you’ll need to create new signs and labels
  • How critical is visibility? Weather-resistance?
  • Sign and label placement – indoors or outdoors?
  • The ability to bring your printer to the jobsite for on the fly labels

The new DuraLabel Toro printer, for example, is battery-powered for mobility, comes with software for pipe marking and custom label design and prints one half inch to four inch wide labels at any length. Light adhesive tape supplies are repositionable and adhere to a variety of surfaces and textures – important when you need to place a label on a wall or in a kitchen that you’re in the midst of preparing to paint.

“I think that being able to re-apply the signs is a huge advantage as walls and finish surfaces tend to change during construction,” said Geoffrey Shafer, PEGASUS Design-To-Build.

As many contractors fit the DIY profile, we’re pretty sure that they’ll opt for creating their own signs and labels when they need them.

 

For more information about the DuraLabel family of mobile printers and rugged supplies for contractors, contact Steve Stephenson, Managing Director, Graphic Products and visit www.DuraLabel.com.

Topics: OSHA Considerations, Compliance Options, Tools and Supplies, Guest Blogs, Signage