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Your Interactive Resource for EPA RRP Information

RRPedia logoLooking for accurate information about the EPA RRP rule?

RRPedia has been created by Shawn McCadden to help remodelers and others affected by the New EPA Renovation Repair and Painting Rule. 

Please read RRPedia Use and Contribution Information before using or contributing to RRPedia.

 


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EPA RRP Lead-Safe Certified Firm Logo Use Guidelines

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Tue, Apr 17, 2012 @ 06:00 AM

EPA Lead-Safe Certified Firm Logo Use Guidelines

Certified firm logo use information

 

 

 

Guidelines for use of the Certified Firm Logo provided by EPA must be followed to avoid fines.   Reading and understanding the following information can help make sure you are in compliance if you plan to use the firm logo on your vehicles, signage and or any marketing you do.


 

What is the Lead-Safe Certified Firm Logo?

The Lead-Safe Certified Firm Logo identifies a firm as certified under the Renovation, Repair, and Painting (RRP) Rule. The colors used to make the two-color logo are Pantone 362C (green) and Pantone 660C (blue). The font is Helvetica.

What are the guidelines for using the Logo?

The Logo must be reproduced so that all of its components are legible and includes your firm's certification number. The Logo must not be altered or distorted in any way.

You MAY --

  • Use the Logo to identify your firm as an RRP-certified firm. Firms that are not RRP-certified may not use the Logo.
  • Use the Logo in brochures, advertisements, Web sites, proposals, bills, signs, uniforms, vehicles and other materials promoting or identifying your firm.
  • Use the Logo on documents or other materials in black and white or color (two-color or four-color versions are available).

You MAY NOT --

  • Use the Logo in any manner that would imply EPA endorsement of a company, its products or services.
  • Reduce the Logo to a size smaller than one inch wide by 0.687 inches in height.
  • Allow a firm that is not RRP-certified (including your subcontractors) to use the Logo.

EPA will monitor the use of all Logos. If necessary, EPA will address failure to comply with these Logo Guidelines. To report a non-compliant use of the Logo, please contact EPA at 1-800-424-LEAD.

EPA will e-mail information regarding your custom Logo to the e-mail address listed on your firm certification application.

For further questions regarding your EPA Lead-Safe Certified firm Logo, please send an email to: EPARRPFirmLogo@battelle.org or send a fax to: (202) 566-0470. In your email/fax please include your EPA Firm Certification number (e.g., NAT-12345-1), Application ID (e.g., 12345), firm name, and firm mailing address.

 

EPA Lead-Safe Certified Firm Logo - Information for Training Providers

Accredited training providers may use the Logo on their site and marketing materials as long as it is used as a tool to guide renovators through the firm certification process (i.e., explain the difference between firm certification and individual training). Training providers may inform students that only certified firms will be provided a customized Logo exclusively for their use to advertise their businesses once their firm has been certified. Training providers may distribute the Logo only to principal instructors affiliated with the accredited provider, and only for the purpose of training as described above. Training providers may NOT distribute the Logo to unaffiliated entities. Upon request, EPA will provide to accredited training provider the Logo for their use. Requests can be made to the National Lead Information Center at 1-800-424-LEAD.

Principal instructors that advertise, provide training, and use the Logo must do so under the name of the accredited training provider for whom they work. They may also state that the organization that employs them, if different from the accredited training provider, is assisting with the training.

 

Information for Press and Marketing Entities

Press and other marketing entities may use the logo on their site and marketing materials provided it does not include a certification number. They may NOT:

  • Distribute or provide a downloadable version of the logo
  • Indicate association, endorsement or approval from EPA
  • Imply lead-safe certification from EPA or any EPA-authorized state.

Upon request, EPA will provide the logo for use.


Note: The information shown above is from the EPA web site.   EPA has already and may again revise these guidelines.  Use this link to find the most recent info at the EPA web site.

 


Topics: EPA RRP for Dummies, RRP for Dummies, Marketing Considerations, Firm Certification, Info for Trainers, RRP Questions

Updates on MA RRP Rule From The MA Department of Labor Standards

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Tue, Apr 03, 2012 @ 05:00 AM

Updates on MA RRP Rule From The MA Department of Labor Standards

MA Department of Labor StandardsAs EPA amends the RRP rule, renovators working in states that have taken over the rule from EPA need to know if and how these states incorporate the changes into their own rule.   Yesterday I inquired with the State of Massachusetts to find out about a few recent amendments and changes.

One of the good things about the state of Massachusetts taking over the RRP rule is that communications with the Department of Labor Standards (DLS) is much easier and much quicker than trying to get answers from EPA.  I also find their staff is much more informed and always helpful.  The Q&A below was conducted completely via email (I sent the questions out of the blue) and I got a complete and what I would call an intuitive response in less than 4 hours!  Credit to the DLS!

 

Here is the Q&A

Paint chip samplingQuestion: Can you tell me if MA allows the lead safe renovation supervisor to take paint chip samples same as EPA does?

DLS Answer: Massachusetts incorporates the federal protocol by reference in our regulation. LSR Supervisors are authorized to sample painted surfaces in accordance with their training.  Of course, they must do adequate sampling for different painting histories of surfaces, document their findings, maintain records of testing and provide documentation to the property owner as required.

 

Question: Does MA require that the firm provide the renovation checklist to owners and tenants within 30 days of completion of final billing, whichever comes first (just like EPA)?

DLS Answer: Yes. DLS has the same documentation requirements as the federal rule.

 

Question:  EPA requires towns and municipalities to become certified firms and have Certified Renovators before doing their own RRP work on town properties that are target housing and or Child Occupied Facilities.   They can however hire out the work to a Certified Firm and therefore would not need to be a Certified Firm if the work is hired out to one.  Does the Massachusetts law follow the same requirements?

DLS Answer:  Yes. Massachusetts mirrors the requirement but offers the opportunity for the fee to be waived for property owners with trained employees working on their own properties.

You can find them listed on our LSRC list published on the DLS web pages.

 

LeadCheck on drywall and plasterQuestion: Also, does MA now recognize LeadCheck for Drywall and Plaster?

DLS Answer: Yes.  But as usual, there is a caveat which is also applicable at the federal level.  When the trained individual takes a sample – s/he must follow the prescribed protocols.  In order to take advantage of the new approval; they must follow the new testing methods and adequately test surfaces.  In some cases, many samples must be taken in order to effectively disclude the work under the rule.

Training Providers will likely being teaching the new methods, however, those who were previously trained will need to justify that they know how to sample in order to validate their findings.  Of course, the safest path is to presume the presence of lead.

 

Question: Any other updates or clarifications I should know about?

DLS Answer: I know you are aware that DLS has been doing enforcement and civil penalties.  We are still interested to have the regulated community provide us feedback to provide better regulations.  I don’t have a specific date but we will certainly let you know when we are going back to public hearings to update our regulation.

Its spring and we are in the field doing compliance checks.

Topics: Enforcement and Inspections, Documentation Considerations, MA RRP Updates, Firm Certification, MA RRP Lead Rules, MA RRP Licensing, Lead Test Kits and Testing, Authorized States, Amendments, RRP Questions

EPA Report Card: How well are they doing with the RRP Rule?

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Sun, Apr 01, 2012 @ 05:00 AM

EPA Report Card:  How well are they doing with the RRP Rule?

Effectiveness of RRP Rule

 

Many news outlets and politicians have been using report card scores to express how well they think people, government policies and regulations are performing.   Several politicians, government employees and even our president have provided their own self assessment scores as well.  It is almost two years now since the EPA RRP Rule went into effect.   I thought I would offer my own report card on how I think the EPA has performed so far in four areas regarding the RRP Rule.  EPA is welcome to offer their own self assessment score.

 

Subject: Outreach about the rule

EPA has claimed to have done extensive outreach to consumers and the regulated community.  They list a variety of methods used and places where ads and announcements were placed.  

Report Card Score: D-

EPA RRP outreach resultsIn reality what they have done has not been effective.  Either the message is not effective, the placement is not effective or both.  According to a survey done by Professional Remodeler magazine 65% of remodelers surveyed estimated that less than 10% of their potential clients are aware of the rule.  Only 5 percent think more than half of homeowners know about it.

On a recent webinar with EPA Officials Regarding RRP Public Awareness and Enforcement Efforts hosted by NCHH, I asked EPA officials if they were doing any tracking to check the actual effectiveness of their outreach efforts.  They are not.  Essentially the answer was that EPA is not a professional marketing organization and has no way of tracking results.   But they said they will be doing more outreach…

 

Subject: Getting Firms Certified

EPA requires all firms doing renovation, repair and painting work on homes built prior to 1978 become EPA Certified Firms before performing or offering to perform such work.

Report Card Score: F

Number of EPA certified firms

Before the rule rule came into effect EPA stated; "There are approximately 211,000 firms estimated to become certified to engage in renovation, repair, or painting activities." As of posting this blog EPA’s web site claims that EPA has certified 97,746 firms (118,885 firms including those approved by authorized states).  According to a report by the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University, the most recent government census showed more than 650,000 businesses received a majority of their revenue by providing remodeling services in 2007 and that number does not include the large number of part-time, semi-retired, and “moonlighting” contractors reporting gross revenues of less than $25,000.   I think we also know there are many illegally operating contractors as well that did not make it into the census count. 

Number of remodeling contractors

Admittedly not all remodeling companies work on pre-1978 homes.  However, there are many other business types other than remodelers who disturb lead paint.  One example is exterminators.  According to Exterminator.com there are over 20,000 extermination companies in the US.  Others who would need to become certified include landlords, property management firms, banks that own foreclosed properties, housing authorities, cities/towns and municipalities. (According to Google answers there are 18,443 cities, towns, villages, and other such governing groups in the United States, not including any island areas other than Puerto Rico) I am sure you could list other business and entity types that would fall under the rule.  My best guess is that EPA has only certified about 10% of the firms that should be certified and has completely misjudge the number of firms affected by this rule.

As a side note, I contacted EPA to find out how many workers have become Certified Renovators so far.  I was told they are still trying to decide how to count them…

 

Subject: Enforcement

There are 12 states that have taken over the rule so far.  That leaves 38 states plus American Samoa, District of Columbia, Guam, US Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico under administration and enforcement by EPA. 

Report Card Score: F

RRP ViolationsSo far EPA has only published one violation since the rule came into effect in April of 2010.  On the other hand the state of Massachusetts took over the rule in July of 2012 and has published over 20 violation enforcements to date.

Though not confirmable facts, one commenter on a LinkedIn discussion claimed “there are only 37 Certified Firms in Maui County when there are 1,500+ Licensed Contractors and double to triple unlicensed contractors”.

Industry insiders report EPA has been doing RRP investigations.  EPA claims we will hear more about violations and enforcement very soon.

 

Subject: Protecting children and others from lead poisoning due to renovations

 “The purpose of the Renovation, Repair, and Painting (RRP) Rule is to minimize exposure from lead-based paint dust during renovation, repair, or painting activities. This is a key effort in reducing the prevalence of childhood lead poisoning, particularly lead poisoning caused by housing contaminated by renovation activities. This will also minimize exposure to older children and adults who are also adversely impacted by lead-based paint dust exposure.”  (From EPA Web site)  

Report Card Score: Incomplete

Is RRP effective, is RRP workingIt is a fact that lead is poisonous and RRP activities can cause poisoning. However, EPA does not know how many children were actually poisoned by RRP activities before the rule came into effect.  If you check any of the data it refers to RRP activities as the “likely source” of lead poisoning, not “the cause”.   That being the case, EPA has no way to know if the RRP rule is making a difference or not.  It is ‘likely” that it is helping.  But, without knowing where EPA started and where we are now that the rule has been in place for almost a year, EPA has no idea if what they have been doing is effective enough and or if or where it can improve effectiveness within the rule. 

Unfortunately, the rule may also be causing more children to be poisoned than before the rule came into effect, because of EPA's inability to adequately enforce it.  As reported in this press release, to keep costs down, consumers are hiring non-certified firms to work on their homes and the required lead safe-practices are not being used.  Also, contractors are reporting that some realtors and insurance adjusters are falsely telling consumers that the rule does not apply at their homes based on location and or for the work they are having done.  All of this has fostered an underground economy of contractors taking advantage of purposely ignoring the rule to keep prices down and improve their ability to sell jobs.

 

How do you think EPA has been doing with the RRP Rule so far?  Consider using the comment area below to offer your own subjects and report card scores.


Topics: Enforcement and Inspections, Firm Certification, Health Effects of Lead, Authorized States, Violation Reports, Effects of the RRP Rule, Statistics, Opinions from Renovators

Amending An EPA RRP Firm Certification

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Fri, Feb 24, 2012 @ 05:00 AM

Amending An EPA RRP Firm Certification

EPA RRP Certified Firm ApplicationThe EPA RRP Rule provides certified firms with adequate time to amend their certification whenever a change to the information included in their RRP Certified Firm application occurs.  You just need to be aware of the requirement to do so and make sure to remember to do so should your information change.

Examples of amendments include a change in the firm's name without transfer of ownership, or a change of address or other contact information.

A firm must amend its certification within 90 days whenever a change occurs to information included in the firm's most recent application. Also, If the firm fails to amend its certification within 90 days of the date the change occurred, the firm would not be authorized to perform renovations until its certification has been amended.  This would be a tough thing for EPA to discover or track proactively, it would most likely happen if the firm was being audited or investigated.

 

 

How to Amend your RRP Certified Firm Application

To amend its certification, a firm must:
  • Amend its certification within 90 days of the date a change occurs to information included in the firm's most recent application.
  • Submit an application, noting on the form that it was submitted as an amendment.
  • Complete the sections of the application pertaining to the new information, and sign and date the form.
  • Include the correct amount of fees.

 

Certified Firm Logo

Important Additional Considerations

  • If one of your sub contractors neglects to update their application they will be violating the rule when working on one of your projects and could cause problems for your business.
  • Amending a certification will not affect the validity of the existing certification or extend the certification expiration date.
  • EPA will issue the firm a new certificate if necessary to reflect information included in the amendment.
  • Firm certifications are not transferable--if the firm is sold, the new owner must submit a new initial application for certification in accordance with 40 CFR 745.89(a).
  • If additional information is needed to process the amendment, or the firm did not pay the correct amount of fees, EPA will request the firm to submit the necessary information or fees.
  • The firm's certification is not amended until the firm complies with the request.

 

Topics: EPA RRP for Dummies, Subcontractor Considerations, Firm Certification, Info for Landlords

If a Lead Test Indicates No Lead, Can A Non-Certified Firm Do The Work?

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Mon, May 30, 2011 @ 06:00 PM

If An EPA Recognized Lead Test Kit Indicates No Lead, Can A Non-Certified Firm Do The Work?

Lead tesing for RRP

 

 

This can be tricky.  Keep in mind that for RRP purposes, only a certified renovator or licensed lead testing professional can do testing to determine that no lead is present.  As EPA indicates in their answer below, if the certified renovator working for a certified firm does the testing, that firm must maintain the required documentation regarding the testing.   So, if the firm that did the testing is doing the renovation, and the testing shows no lead, they can hire (subcontract to) non-certified firms and non-certified workers to do the work.  

 

Here is one question and answer I found on the EPA FAQ page to help clarify:

Question: If a certified renovator using an EPA-recognized test kit determines that the components that will be affected by a renovation are free of lead-based paint, can a firm that does not have RRP certification do the actual renovation work? What record-keeping requirements would apply?

EPA Answer: Where a certified renovator uses an EPA-recognized test kit, follows the kit manufacturer’s instructions, tests each component affected by the renovation, and determines that the components are free of paint or other surface coatings that contain lead at regulated levels, the renovation can be performed by a non-certified firm and without regard to the work practice standards or record-keeping requirements of the RRP Rule. See 40 CFR 745.82(a)(2). 

However, the certified renovator and firm making the lead-based paint free determination are still subject to the recordkeeping requirements of 745.86(b)(1)(ii) and 745.86(a). Specifically, the certified renovator must prepare a record that states the brand of test kit used, the components tested, and results of the tests. The certified renovator’s firm must retain a copy of this record for three years. EPA further recommends that the firm actually performing the renovation also retain a copy of these records to demonstrate that compliance with the RRP Rule was not required.

 

Lead paint testingSo it appears that a non-certified firm can do the work if testing that proved no lead was found was done by someone else, as long as the determination was made by a certified lead inspector or risk assessor, or by a certified renovator using an EPA recognized test kit and following the kit manufacturer’s instructions.    The key is however, that the non-certified firm must have written proof from the person or business that did the testing that there is no lead in the work areas to be disturbed.

 

 

EPA RRP Logo 

So, here is the rub. 

If you are a certified firm and have a certified renovator do the testing, and you give the homeowner a copy of the testing report you create, that homeowner could then hire a non-certified firm to do the work because that homeowner and the non-certified firm they hire can use your test results to avoid RRP firm and work requirements.  Think about this before you test and make your own best decision about if and when you will test during the sales process.

Topics: RRP Questions, Subcontractor Considerations, Sales Considerations, Compliance Options, Firm Certification, Lead Test Kits and Testing, Info for Landlords

Do My Sub Contractors Need To Be RRP Certified?

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Fri, May 27, 2011 @ 06:00 AM

Do My Sub Contractors Need To Be RRP Certified?

RRP Certification requirements for subsThere has been a lot of confusion regarding the details of the EPA RRP rule.  One that seems to pop up over and over is certification requirements for sub contractors.  There are two different certification considerations regarding sub contractors; firm certification and worker certification.  Let’s take a look at each separately.

 

 

Firm Certification for Sub Contractors:

The EPA is very clear on this.  The following question and answer comes from the EPA web site’s FAQ page:

Question: My firm performs renovations covered by the RRP rule, but solely in the capacity of a subcontractor. If the general contractor is a certified firm, does my firm also have to be certified, or can we just provide the certified renovator?

EPA Answer: All firms performing, offering, or claiming to perform renovations covered by the RRP rule must be certified. In this case, both the general contractor and subcontractor must become certified firms.  

 

Certified Firm requirementsWhether working for the general contractor as a trade partner or a 1099 sales person (offers the work), sub contractors must become certified firms by apply for certification through the EPA.   Ensuring that the subs they use are certified firms is particularly important for general contractors, because as part of the required documentation under the rule, the renovation checklist must include the names of all workers who participated in RRP activities on the job.  If a sub contractor and his workers do work on the job and the sub’s firm is not certified, the EPA will easily be able to find both the general contractor and the sub in violation of the rule.  If a general contractor knows that subs must be certified firms, hiring a non-certified firm to work on a job becomes a knowing and willful violation of the rule, which brings with it serious penalties.  It’s also one easy way for a customer’s lawyer to suggest the contractor is/was negligent.

Note: Both Massachusetts and Rhode Island have this same requirement for sub contractors. 

 

Worker Certification for Sub Contractors:

Again, the EPA is very clear on this.  The following question and answer comes from the EPA web site’s FAQ page:

Question: Under the RRP Rule, can a certified renovator supervise workers of a different company, or must each firm involved in a project furnish a certified renovator?

EPA Answer: All firms performing renovations must ensure that all individuals performing renovation activities on behalf of the firm are either certified renovators or have been trained by a certified renovator.  The RRP Rule does not prohibit firms from reaching agreement on which will supply the certified renovator who is responsible for ensuring compliance with the RRP Rule and who directs and trains non-certified workers.  All firms remain liable for ensuring compliance with the RRP Rule.    

 

Who is Liable, The General Contractor or the Sub?

The following question and answer provides clarification regarding the responsibility and liability of the business that is acting as the general contractor:

Question: Is the certified renovator assigned to a specific project responsible for the work practices of other contractors on the project if the certified renovator is an employee of the general contractor of the project?

EPA Answer: All firms performing renovations must ensure that all individuals performing renovation activities on behalf of the firm are either certified renovators or have been trained by a certified renovator. A firm acting as a general contractor may satisfy this requirement by hiring another certified firm that takes responsibility for ensuring that all individuals performing the renovation activities are either certified renovators or have been trained by a certified renovator. With respect to assigning a certified renovator who is responsible for any on-the-job training and regularly directing workers who are not certified renovators, a firm acting as a general contractor my satisfy this requirement by hiring another certified firm that in turn assigns a certified renovator to the job. However, this does not discharge the general contractor's liability to ensure compliance with the Renovation, Repair, and Painting Rule.

Note: The answer above also applies in Massachusetts, but does not apply in Rhode Island.  In Rhode Island, the RI Lead Hazard Control Standard (Section 14.0) requires the Licensed Lead Hazard Control Firm (LHCF) to have a RI licensed Lead-Safe Remodeler/Renovator (LRM) designee as a condition of licensure.

Topics: RRP Questions, Worker Training, Certified Renovator Training, Subcontractor Considerations, Compliance Options, Legal Considerations, RI Conciderations, Firm Certification, MA RRP Lead Rules

Undercover Investigation Calls Out EPA on Lack of RRP Enforcement

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Wed, May 25, 2011 @ 06:00 AM

Undercover News Investigation Calls Out EPA on Lack of RRP Enforcement

The video below from newsnet5.com offers a good summary of the challenges renovators are up against due to illegal competition and a government that has mandated a law that is meant to protect children without the resources and commitment to follow through. Without enforcement, in addition to causing challenges for complying businesses, the law offers a false sense of security for children and their parents who believe the government is protecting them from lead poisoning.  In fact, as the video points out, the law is in effect actually causing more lead poisoning because of the lower priced illegal contractors who ignore lead-safe work practices.

The RRP rule has definitely contributed to expanding the underground economy in the remodeling industry.   Illegally operating businesses and moonlighters ignoring the rule as well as the required work practices have been stealing work away from legally operating businesses, mostly due to the fact that they can offer much lower prices than those who comply.    This has made it very challenging for many renovators.  It has also put many children at risk of lead poisoning.

Effects of RRP RuleAt a RRP workshop I attended last week, sponsored by the Lead and Environmental Hazards Association (LEHA), several renovators complained to Mike Wilson of EPA about EPA’s handling so far of the RRP rule.   One after the other renovators cited examples of projects they had lost to other businesses that are ignoring the rule.   Several even reported home owners had laughed at them when they tried discussing the rule and its requirements.    One attendee reported that a homeowner actually told him that he would find another contractor who would ignore the rule as a way of saving money.  It all seemed to be new news to Mike Wilson who told us he oversees RRP Policy, so could not comment specifically about enforcement.  When asked what message he would bring back to the EPA in Washington after the meeting, Mike said he would let them know that regulated contractors wanted a level playing field.   Attendees let Mike know that they have been already giving that same message to EPA, perhaps if Mike delivers the message the leadership at EPA will listen and take action.

Topics: Enforcement and Inspections, Firm Certification, Effects of the RRP Rule, Videos, Statistics, Opinions from Renovators

Videos About The EPA RRP Rule

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Fri, Oct 15, 2010 @ 08:00 AM

New Shawn McCadden Videos About The EPA RRP Rule; RRP Information For Renovators

RRP Instructor Shawn McCaddenI recently completed a series of seven videos about the new EPA RRP rule. The RRP videos were done for Remodeling magazine. They are posted to the Remodeling TV area of Remodeling magazine’s web site.

The videos are sponsored by The Home Depot. The video series is titled “The Insider's Guide to the EPA's Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule”. The series covers critical information about the Environmental Protection Agency's RRP rule and certification process, and explains how the rule may affect your business.

I had a lot of fun doing the videos. Lots of great people donated their time, knowledge and expertise. I also learned a lot from Chuck Green of Perpetual Motion Pictureswriting the script, interviewing contributors, editing the script with the magazine’s editor Sal Alfano, reviewing the raw footage, and working with the videographer, Chuck Greeen of Perpetual Motion Pictures. Working with Chuck was a unique advantage. As a fellow remodeler and Certified Renovator, Chuck not only filmed and edited the videos, he also contributed greatly to the content and success of the whole project.

Here is a list of the videos, a brief description of what is discussed in each as well as links to view them:

Video One: The EPA RRP Rule and Your Business

This video covers the business responsibilities, associated liabilities and risks related to the RRP Rule. Kermit Baker, Senior Research Fellow at Harvard University's Joint Center for Housing Studies stresses that remodelers need to become experts in this area or leave the work to others who are. Attorney Mike Sams of Kenney & Sams, P.C. warns about the legal liabilities for failure to follow the regulations. Shawn McCadden discusses the firm and worker certification process, related fees as well as certified renovator and firm responsibilities.

 

Video Two: RRP Training

This video covers the worker training requirements of the rule and the content of the EPA Certified Renovator training class. Shawn McCadden also discusses the importance and benefits of choosing a training class conducted by a training instructor with real life renovation experience.

 

Video Three: EPA RRP Notification Requirements

The EPA RRP rule specifies certain notification requirements depending on where the work is done and who occupies and or visits the building being renovated. This video covers these requirements, related firm documentation requirements as well as the information and documentation that must be given to property owners and others. Shawn McCadden also discusses many of the important details that must be included in the required documentation.

 

Video Four: RRP Work Practices

This video includes a summary of the required lead-safe work practices required under the RRP Rule. Shawn McCadden walks through critical considerations related to the rule that must be followed to stay in compliance with the rule, protect occupants and workers and to control costs. Shawn also discusses interior and exterior cleaning and cleaning verification requirements.

 

Video Five: RRP Record Keeping

Inspection of the required documentation under the rule will be a major enforcement tool used by EPA. In this video Shawn McCadden discusses the required documentation related to worksite activities as well as many business administration activities. Mark Paskell of the Contractor Coaching Partnership shares a few of the many methods EPA will have at their disposal to inspect and verify a firm’s compliance with the rule. Shawn adds several more methods to Mark’s list and also discusses the penalties and fines EPA can assess on violators.

 

Video Six: Exemptions to RRP Work Practices

In this video Shawn McCadden gives examples of when, where and why the RRP rule and work practices are not required under the rule. Shawn stresses that even if the work practices are not required under the RRP rule, your business will still be liable if lead poisoning and or contamination results from the way work is performed. Shawn and contractor insurance expert Tom Messier of Mason and Mason Insurance both stress the importance of verifying proper and adequate insurance coverage to protect your business, available coverage options as well as related costs for coverage.

 

Video Seven: Business Considerations and Summary

Shawn Mccadden stresses that this new rule is a game changer. Shawn tells us businesses must take this new rule seriously and adjust their business practices accordingly to protect profits and control liabilities. Mark Paskell of the Contractor Coaching Partnership stresses that contractors should verify that the documentation forms they use will comply with the rule and also assist the business in managing and performing the work. Gerry McGonagle of Belfor Property Restoration offers his advice on qualifying the right employees to do the work. Shawn also discusses some of the new responsibilities the rule brings with it for employees in all positions within the business.

If you are looking for forms and signage to help you with comply with the EPA RRP rule, I recommend you check out what The Lead Paint Forms Store has to offer.

Topics: EPA RRP Lead Rules, EPA RRP for Dummies, Business Considerations, Work Practice Exclusions, Worker Training, Certified Renovator Training, Enforcement and Inspections, Legal Considerations, Work Practices, Documentation Considerations, Firm Certification, Insurance Considerations, Videos

EPA Releases Penalty Guidelines for RRP Enforcement

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Thu, Sep 02, 2010 @ 05:54 PM

EPA Releases Penalty Guidelines for RRP Enforcement

EPA enforcement

The EPA recently released a new government document, titled the Consolidated Enforcement Response and Penalty Policy (ERPP), laying out enforcement and penalty guidelines for the Renovation, Repair and Painting (RRP) rule.  The guidelines were announced in a memorandum from Rosemarie A. Kelly, Director of the U.S. EPA Waste and Chemical Enforcement Division, on Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance letterhead.  The memorandum was dated August 19, 2010.  The new policy was created because even though the RRP ruling was issued in April 2010, enforcement and penalty issues were not clearly defined and articulated in the ruling then.

In the memorandum, Rosemarie A. Kelly states:

"This Policy sets forth guidance for Agency officials to use in determining the appropriate enforcement response and penalty amounts for violations of Section 409 of TSCA resulting from failure or refusal to comply with provisions of the Pre-Renovation Education Rule (PRE Rule); Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule (RRP Rule); and Lead-Based Paint Activates, Certification and Training Rule (LBP Activities Rule). "

 

confusedI suggest you check out the introduction section in the policy document.  Although the policy document is intended to provide guidelines for EPA Enforcement staff, the document introduction also states: 

"Enforcement staff should continue to make appropriate case-by-case enforcement judgments, guided by, but not restricted or limited to, the policies contained in this document”

 

View or download the August 19, 2010 memorandum

View or download the the enforcement guidelines document (ERPP).

View or download the Final RRP Rule with Preamble

View or download the amendment regarding the Opt-Out and Record Keeping Provisions

View or download the June 18, 2010 memo delaying enforcement of certain certification requirements

Topics: EPA RRP Lead Rules, Enforcement and Inspections, Legal Considerations, RRP for Dummies, EPA RRP Rule Updates, Firm Certification

Insurance Companies Rethinking Coverage Due to EPA RRP Rule

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Thu, Sep 02, 2010 @ 01:26 PM

Insurance Companies Will Be Rethinking Coverage and Premiums Due to EPA RRP Rule

RRP Insurance folderMany liability insurance policies do not cover lead poisoning or contamination.  Renovators should be sure they are working with an agent who is up on the EPA RRP rule and should sit down with their agent to review their coverage needs and options.  Tom Messier, with Mason and Mason Insurance, tells me that insurance companies are starting to become aware of the RRP rule.  Insurance is all about risk. The greater the risk, the higher the cost of insurance will be.

 

RRP LogoIncreased risk of liability due to lead awareness as well as the government mandated certification requirements are likely to affect a renovator’s ability to get a policy as well as the premium charged by carriers who offer coverage.  Tom told me he predicts that existing policies will not be renewed unless a renovator can show they are certified firms and use certified renovators to oversee the work their company performs.  He also predicts insurance carriers will start requiring the insured’s proof of compliance with the rule as well as proof of compliance and insurance coverage for the trade partners the insured renovator works with.  Tom stressed that this would be for both liability as well as workers compensation insurance coverages. He said that even if they are self-employed, insurance carriers will likely require all trade partners have their own workers compensation policies as a way to prevent injured or poisoned trade partners from claiming against the general contractor’s policy. 

Also Tom warns, just as many insurance companies now review the contracts contractors use with customers and trade partners before offering or renewing a policy, Tom predicts carriers will be asking to see completed copies of the required RRP documentation used by contractors.   I asked Tom what renovators should do to protect themselves and be sure they can maintain coverage going forward.  Tom’s response; “Document, document, document!!!” 

Apertment for rent signOne other area that will likely be of concern is lead coverage in policies for landlords who own pre-1978 properties.  Here too, compliance with RRP rules and documentation of work practices used for renovations and repairs will likely become required conditions of obtaining and keeping coverage.  The EPA RRP rule may also cause an increase in insurance coverage on properties built prior to 1978, for landlords and maybe even home owners.

Topics: Subcontractor Considerations, Documentation Considerations, Firm Certification, Shawn's Predictions, Info for Landlords, Insurance Considerations, Effects of the RRP Rule