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RRPedia has been created by Shawn McCadden to help remodelers and others affected by the New EPA Renovation Repair and Painting Rule. 

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How much will it cost contractors to comply with the EPA RRP Rule?

Posted by Shawn McCadden on Tue, Apr 20, 2010 @ 10:06 AM

How much will it cost contractors to comply with the Renovation, Repair, and Painting (EPA RRP) Rule?

Firm applicationFirst, there are up-front costs including firm certification (required to offer, sell and or be under contract to perform the work) and the cost of Certified Renovator training for those doing and or supervising the actual work.  Other up front costs can include tools and equipment needed to perform the work including a HEPA vacuum, cleaning equipment, personal protection equipment for workers, specialized tools and containment related equipment such as products like Zip Walls.

Zip wall example

There will also be job related costs specific to the kind of work performed.  Examples could include additional labor, tape, plastic sheeting, cleaning solutions, sprayers, staples, disposable wipes, HEPA filters, trash bags, tack pads, etc. Click here to request a tools and supplies shopping list.   Contractors will need to consider new estimating categories/divisions as well as matching job costing categories to help verify and or improved estimated cost assumptions.  Time cards and labor tracking codes should also be considered.

Contractors should also be aware of related overhead costs.  These costs could include employee time to fill out and maintain required documentation, training of non-certified workers, delivery and documentation of pre-education materials, marketing and sales related expenses, time trying to get answers from the EPA, recertification costs, employee health testing, updating contracts, legal advice, insurance costs, continuing education, law suits, etc. 

Contractors should devise ways to separate out EPA RRP related  job costs and overhead expenses within their financial system in a way that gives them the ability to determine how RRP related compliance affects their costs of doing business.

Here is how the EPA answers this question:

"Information collected by EPA for the purposes of the rulemaking indicates that many contractors already follow some of the work practices required by the rule, such as using disposable plastic sheeting to cover floors and objects in the work area.  These estimates do not include the costs of those practices.

EPA estimates that the costs of containment, cleaning, and cleaning verification will range from $8 to $167 per job, with the exception of those exterior jobs where vertical containment would be required.  This includes:
·     Costs of equipment (for example, plastic sheeting, tape, HEPA vacuums and tool shrouds - the equipment varies by job).
·     Costs of labor (for example, the time required to perform cleaning and cleaning verification).

In addition to work practice costs, your costs will include training fees and certification fees.  The costs include:
·     Training costs to individual renovators working in pre-1978 housing or child-occupied facilities who must take a course from an accredited training provider (cost is set by the training provider; estimated to be about $200 for a 5-year certification).
·     Certification costs to firms to obtain certification from EPA ($300 fee to the U.S. Treasury for a 5-year certification.  (This fee is required by law to cover program administration)." 

Topics: RRP Questions, Business Financials, Estimating Considerations, Business Considerations, Legal Considerations, Tools and Supplies